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June 30, 2005

Hoysala Temple III - Temple Interior

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensSigma 15mm f/3.5
Shutter / Aperture1/8s / f/3.5
ISO3200

Here is a picture facing inwards from the temple entrance. It is extremely dark inside, the only light being provided by the entryway and tiny little square portholes that have been carved into the side.

The interior of the temple is shaped like a "T" with statues of deities being placed at the tip of the "T"—behind the bars at the far end of this shot—and also at the tip of each side of the bar. I tried to get pictures of these, but they were far too dark to shoot hand held.

I was incredibly impressed with how well the camera operated, hand held at 1/8s for this shot!

 

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June 29, 2005

Hoysala Temple II - Kama Sutra Carving Detail

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron 28-200mm f/2.8 @ 28mm
Shutter / Aperture1/40s / f/3.5
ISO100

One portion of the temple exterior is devoted to carvings of the kama sutra. Our temple guide explained this as pictoral sexual education for the illiterate commoner. The illiterate commoner was probably better informed of bedroom gymnastics than your average American.

I had a hard time trying to make this shot look interesting. The lack of contrast in the carvings was giving me a lot trouble. In the end, I settled for this rather cheesy shot with a shallow depth of field. This shot doesn't show a lot of the variety in the carvings, but I like it as cheesy as it is.

 

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June 28, 2005

Hoysala Temple I

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensSigma 15mm f/3.5
Shutter / Aperture1/200s / f/8
ISO200

The Hoysala temple is hundreds of years old and is carved completely out of soapstone. This was bar far one of the most impressive things I had seen in India.

 

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June 27, 2005

House Outside of Talakad Temple Complex

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron 28-200mm f/2.8 @ 28mm
Shutter / Aperture1/100s / f/7.1
ISO100

After our tour of Talakad we waited for a few moments while the driver purchased some food for himself. While waiting in this rural Indian town I looked around and thought about what it would be like to live there. The village life probably isn't so bad.

Across the street stood this little house with a Spanish roof. I liked the way it looked in the sunlight and took this simple picture.

 

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June 26, 2005

Milwaukee Art Museum - Burke Brise Soleil

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensSigma 15mm f/3.5
Shutter / Aperture1/50s / f/8
ISO100

I took this just before the wedding reception for Mike Yun and Mimi Lee's Wedding. The reception was held at the Milwaukee Art Museum and this is a photograph of the Burke Brise Soleil from the interior.

If you haven't been to the museum and you live anywhere near Milwaukee, I highly recommend it. Not only is the building architecture splendid and completely unique in America, but their collection is quite excellent as well.

Sometimes I love my camera. This is one of those times. It was so very easy to frame up this shot and take shot this should not even be considered art.

1/50, f/8 hand-held with anti-shake turned on. No camera-shake is visible at all. The file is so wonderfully sharp as it should be. I'm very happy. There isn't even any evidence of the lens defect I created after I dropped my fish-eye at Golconda Fortress in India a few months ago!

I processed this through ACR and then converted it to black and white using a couple of HSL layers. Added on top is my favorite TMAX 3200 grain file at 28% opacity to give the image "the funk."

 

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June 25, 2005

Congratulations Mimi and Michael - Pyebaek

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron SP 28-200mm @ 70mm
Shutter / Aperture1/60s / f/3.2
ISO100

This was the first traditional Korean wedding ceremony I had ever been to. I didn't have any idea what was going on, so I was very thankful to have Mimi and Mike's friends there to explain to me what was going on. Later on, I found a couple of useful links that also gave me some more information.

In this photo, a cup full of soju is being passed to members of the groom's family as an offering. Each member of the groom's family receives a drink. The bride and groom then bow to them and finally chestnuts are thrown. This process is repeated for all members of the groom's family who want to take part and with a big extended family it appeared to get quite tiring!

Mimi and Mike persevered admirably. The outfits were so beautiful and amazing I couldn't help myself but take tens of pictures during this event. This was one of the photos that I thought turned out really well. I am quite pleased with the framing, action, and the expressions on Mimi and Mike's faces. Congratulations once again guys!

 

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June 23, 2005

Outside Talakad Temple Post "Blessure"

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron 28-200mm f/2.8 @ 28mm
Shutter / Aperture1/125s / f/4
ISO100

Jim took this photo of Shiva and I after I was blessed in the temple. I think the priest got a little exuberant when he applied the splash of holy water as my bindi dripped red like a fresh wound.

I got some interesting looks that day from other Indians. I know it's somewhat common for non-Hindus to partake in some sort of a ceremony when they come to India and wear a bindi, but I still felt special.

 

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Talakad Temple

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron 28-200mm f/2.8 @ 28mm
Shutter / Aperture1/100s / f/7.1
ISO100

The Talakad Temple Complex outside of Mysore is an ancient forest that has been inundated with sand. Among the dunes, temples have been unearthed and restored. Some are dating back nearly 1,000 years.

I saw four temples of the more than thirty that are believed to be below the sand in the area. This one is one of the older ones. They were positively amazing to see.

Later on this day I got blessed at one of the temples devoted to Shakti. It involved receiving a blessing, a bindi, touching fire and a receiving a final splash of holy water by a boy that could have been no more than 10. I even bought a protective amulet from him for about 20 rupees to help me on my travels. I made it back safe and sound, who knows...perhaps it worked!

 

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June 21, 2005

Harvesting Mustard Seed II

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensMinolta 50mm f/1.4
Shutter / Aperture1/1000s / f/2.8
ISO100

A continuation from yesterday.

I really like the emotional feel of this photograph. I remember checking the shots on the back of my camera after we got back on the road and feeling that I captured the scene well. There definitely is a sense of, "we harvest mustard, what of it?" in this shot.

I do remember now: I did have aperture priority set. Sadly it wasn't until I got to a better display back in Hyderabad that I found out that f/2.8 can be a little soft with this lens. Even sadder still I didn't find out until I got back to the states that the primary defect was with the camera's CCD calibration causing it to back-focus ever so slightly. That really made my shallow depth-of-field shots a hit-or-miss challenge.

I found out when I got to Japan that I shot better on the camera when it was like this after I had a few drinks in me :-)

 

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Harvesting Mustard Seed I

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensMinolta 50mm f/1.4
Shutter / Aperture1/1000s / f/3.2
ISO100

This was one of my favorite stops that Jim and I took while we were touring Karnataka. Jim, again with his quick eye, said, "stop!" and we pulled over our vehicle and asked these ladies if we could watch what they were doing and take their picture.

It was fascinating watching them thresh the mustard seed. It still makes me wonder how much of their product ends up making overseas.

I cannot remember if I purposely set the aperture that wide or if I left the aperture priority on my camera set like a doofus. If I could go back in do it again I would have just added a touch more depth of field, either by stopping down or stepping back, so I could have got all four women in focus.

 

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June 20, 2005

Fields of Karnataka - Boys of the Field

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron SP 28-200mm f/2.8 @ 75mm
Shutter / Aperture1/80s / f/11
ISO100

The people in the country was so nice and friendly. It seemed that any time we stopped on the side of the road to relax or relieve ourselves that people would be smiling and waving to come and join them down in the fields.

 

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Congratulations Mimi and Michael - First Dance

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron SP 28-200mm f/2.8 @ 28mm
Shutter / Aperture1/60s / f/2.8
ISO100

This picture was taken at Mimi Lee and Michael Yun's wedding from last weekend. This was their first dance. Congratulations guys!

 

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June 19, 2005

Milwaukee Art Museum - Fluorescent Mystery Sculpture

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensSigma 15mm f/3.5
Shutter / Aperture1/[400..13]s / f/8
ISO/ Special Processing100 / 7 Combined Exposures

Last weekend I attended a wedding—a lavish, fun, entertaining wedding that makes you dread ever to have to even consider conducting one of those affairs yourself— at the Milwaukee Art Museum. I had been taking pictures all weekend of the various wedding proceedings (pictures on that later!) and this shot was from the wedding reception that was held at the Milwaukee Art Museum, to which I had never been before.

I figured that since it was getting late and receptions tend to be romantic darkly lit affairs I had better bring my table-top miniature tripod. I got no further than five steps out of the elevator when I spotted this sculpture. I put the tripod on the floor and took a series of pictures bracketed around the in-camera center-weighted meter but I wasn't happy with any of them: either the highlights were blown or the background was too dark. There was just too much exposure latitude to cover. Then it dawned on me, "hey, why not try out mixing multiple exposures?"

So, that's what I did. This is seven exposures from -3 EV to +3 EV. I wasn't quite happy with the first mix I put together so I also (tediously) created a mask for the lights, reduced saturation in spots and brought up the background. I hope you find the result interesting.

Just about the only thing that I am not pleased with is that I did not record the name of this piece of art! I've searched extensively on the web and on the MAM collection page but to no avail. So, here's the deal: if any of you should find the name of this piece of art before I do I'll send you a signed 8x10 in print of it.

 

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June 17, 2005

Bylakuppe Tibetan Settlement - Painting Monk

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron SP 28-200mm f/2.8 @ 135mm
Shutter / Aperture1/160s / f/4.5
ISO100

The Dalai Lama happened to be present while were touring Bylakuppe. Monks were busy putting the finishing touches on the new temple and painting every other surface that needed paint.

I could tell that some of the monks were sick of the tourists and their cameras. I actually got a little bit of a sneer from this fellow. But you know, I don't blame him.

I think a lot of tourists view Tibetan Buddhism as a lot of smells and bells set in a fantasy world without really grasping what is going on at all. I cannot say I have the deepest of understandings of the religion but I could see how this could get on my nerves. I thought about this at the time, too, but this didn't stop me from taking the picture anyway. I guess that makes me a bad person...

...or maybe I am just following my path.

 

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June 15, 2005

Bylakuppe Tibetan Settlement - The New Temple Zongkar Choede

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron SP 28-200mm f/2.8
Shutter / Aperture1/300s / f/10
ISO100

This is a side shot of the Zongkar Choede temple at the Bylakuppe Tibetan Settlement in the Indian State of Karnataka. To my eye it looks like the color palatte is straight out of Disneyland.

I have never seen more Westerners in one spot in all of India at any of the other tourists spots, exclusive of the Taj Mahal, than at this Tibetan settlement. This goes to show you that Westerners just love Tibetan Buddhism.

The funny thing is, about one month after returing to the United States some friends and I went to the Mall of America (about 10 minutes from my house) to perform some routine shopping. There we saw monks from this very same settlement creating a sand mandala in one of the rotunda. There was plenty of literature saying, "please donate alms to us for our children's settlement in Bylakuppe," and a large container to drop envelopes of cash into it.

I am sure that I did not nor understand the complete picture while I toured the settlement but relative to almost anywhere else I was in India, Bylakuppe's peoples looked to be well cared for and in a fine state. With all the huge new structures sporting fresh paint and gold leaf I am not sure if they needed any money from me. Sure was fun to visit though!

 

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Betel Nut Worker's Line - Child of the Line

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron SP 28-200mm f/2.8 @ 100mm
Shutter / Aperture1/300s / f/5.6
ISO100

It was probably in the low 30's °C (in the upper eighties °F) and I couldn't believe that they had this kid in a polar-fleece jacket. I am sure they were just trying to prevent the little guy from catching cold in those harsh South-Indian winters.

For the longest time this guy would not look at me. I think he was scared of the strange looking foreigners. After I interacted with the women in the line and stayed a bit he grew a bit more comfortable and I was able to take this picture. It would be hard to come to work with mom every day. Why couldn't she peel something I can eat instead of just betel nuts?

 

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June 14, 2005

Betel Nut Worker's Line - The Divider Divided

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron SP 28-200mm f/2.8 @ 35mm
Shutter / Aperture1/250s / f/4.5
ISO100

My apologies for not writing annotations for the past several days. I was out of town in Milwaukee attending a wedding and I didn't have time to update the blog as I would have wished. It's quite the commitment to try and update this daily! I will try to at least at some short annotations to the previous photos so I can try and provide a better sense of context.

After the nuts were peeled by the line of women the finished nuts all went to this man for dividing. He seemed to be the one running the show. Our approach to the operation was cleared by him and he was the one that nodded when I asked if I could take photos.

He gets to sit in the shade.

 

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June 13, 2005

Betel Nut Worker's Line - Peeling II

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron SP 28-200mm f/2.8
Shutter / Aperture1/125s / f/6.3
ISO100
 

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June 12, 2005

Aliens?

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensMinolta 50mm f/1.4
Shutter / Aperture1/125s / f/4
ISO100

Forgive me. I flowered.

 

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June 11, 2005

Walker In the Morning - Color

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensSigma 15mm f/3.5
Shutter / Aperture1/6s / f/11
ISO / Metering Mode100 / Spot

This image is the color version of this image. Which do you like?

 

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June 10, 2005

Betel Nut Worker's Line - Peeling I

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensMinolta 50mm f/1.4
Shutter / Aperture1/250s / f/8
ISO100
 

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Main > Diary

June 9, 2005

Power Outage

Sorry about the outage today. A major storm riped through the Minneapolis area last night. I lost power here at the house around 5:00am and it was out until just before I got home tonight around midnight. I heard on the radio the nearly 100,000 Minnesotans lost their power.

Since the server is hosted at the house my bits had no way to get to get out to the world. Total bummer.

I decided not to post a new image on the photoblog tonight. I figured that people probably didn't get a good look at what I posted yesterday so I would just leave up what I've got.

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June 7, 2005

The Hold Steady at First Avenue

I saw The Hold Steady last night with my brother at First Avenue last night. I guess I am not hip enough to say that I had heard of them first or that I knew the lead singer and lyricist Craig Finn from his days fronting Liftr Pullr or kicking around the mean streets of Edina. In fact, I had only heard them for the first time perhaps a month or so ago on one of our local indie-friendly radio stations, 89.3 The Current.

The Hold Steady put me in a unique place. I can say that I thoroughly enjoy listening to them anytime I am engaged enough to listen to lyrics. The turns of phrase and mutli-layered allegoric imagery often reaches me. It speaks to experiences I've never had but am vaguely aware of. I think I know Your Little Hoodrat Friend; she's the one that worked at The Wedge, right?

For however entertained I am by the lyrics, no matter how colorful, apropos or nostalgic the observations are I cannot stand the classic rock "stylings" of the backing band for very long. It's the very curious juxtaposition of indie meets uncle-joe-with-a-beer-can that simply doesn't work for long haul listening session. I think my brother put it best when he called the band "the best pocket rockers in New York."

Last night marks the first time for my brother and I where we actually left a venue mid-set in order to grab a slice of pizza up at Pizza Lucé and then returned to catch their encore with fresh ears. Bless the magic of the smoking ban which inadvertantly added hand stamping and re-entry to First Ave!

I think the Minneapolis Star Tribune put it best when they said:

The Bowery show was as ambitious as the album. Recorded over 28 days instead of the six spent on last year's debut, "The Hold Steady Almost Killed Me," its dueling guitars and piano and organ melodies sound more geared to geezer-rock station KQRS (92.5 FM) than college outlet Radio K (770 AM).

Dave Gardner, the former Selby Tiger who co-produced the album, said: "Those guys made me listen to the first Billy Joel record before I came out. I was like, 'You're kidding me.' "

An excellent bit of commentary from heartonastick reveals:

The instruments play pure comfort food. Anyone who grew up listening to big-market classic rock radio is going to recognize every note, even if they can't exactly place them. There's a good chunk of E-Street sound—the over-mic'd snares, the piano pounding over rich Hammond whole notes, the low-register horn blasts. Guitar theatrics tend toward simple meat and potato riffs. Sometimes there's room on the side for a Bruce Hornsby solo. It's déjà vu on repeat.

Against that, vocalist Finn whines and barks and wheezes out stories of punks and pushers and hope and redemption. The words are relentlessly quotable and often rhythmically palatable, but the frontman’s nasal speak-singing can be abrasive. He sounds a little like a cross between Greg Proops and Rex Harrison, or your high school shop teacher and Eminem[...]The more you listen, the more it works: For some reason, it sounds like the most natural odd combo since Kerouac [shrieked] along with Steve Allen.

But then goes on to admit:

The loud-soft-loud Your Little Hoodrat Friend, with revved-up riffage, female back-up vocals and lyrics that are actually sung, may score the band some play, but it comes too early on the album. While there are memorable lines sprinkled throughout the CD, the tempo and tone remain too consistent and the music too anonymous to shake things up.

If they only would add some more dynamics to their instrumentation I think they would really have something amazing. The highlight of the evening for me was when Craig Finn actually did a hip-hop number with his opening act, P.O.S. of Doomtree. All of the lyrical magic with a beat I can groove. It kept me feeling special.

It will be interesting to see if the band evolves. But for now, I'm filing them in the colorful, novelty category I reserve only for special gems like The Rumble Bees (home).

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Betel Nut Worker's Line

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron SP 28-200mm f/2.8 @ 28mm
Shutter / Aperture1/400s / f/5.6
ISO100

Using the same principal and agreement I had between Jim and myself as with the cane workers we had met earlier that morning, we had the car pulled over again when we saw a farm house and these colorful women shelling betel nuts.

The betel nut is actually properly named the areca nut. The misnomer stems from the practice of curing, chopping, and rolling the nuts with sweetening agents and spices in betel leaf&emdash;called pan in India&emdashwhich is chewed to a mash and used as a refreshing stimulant.

This shot is just a tad over exposed. It was tremendously bright that day. I don't know how those women can sit in the sun all day long!

 

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June 6, 2005

Coconut Water, Roadside Refreshment

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensTameron SP 28-200mm f/2.8 @ 28mm
Shutter / Aperture1/125s / f/5.6
ISO100

Nothing is more refreshing after a day in the Indian sunshine than a freshly sliced open coconut water. Ubiquitously found in many tropical places around the globe, the coconut water man pushing his bicycle heavy with bunches of sweet fruits is a welcome sight for a person with a dry throat. At only 5 rupees (about US$0.10), sterile and delicious, it really cannot be beat!

My favorite part of the entire process is when you finish drinking the juice the man hacks the nut apart for you, cutting and separating a sliver of the husk for you to scoop out the jelly-like insides. It's like a banquet served in courses, each portion of be savored individually.

Coconut Spash 100% Crop

Certainly if you go out and take enough pictures you will experience what I call, "the cliffhanger moment." It's that moment when press the shutter release and the mirror flips up and cuts you off from the rest of the world. The bottom falls out of your stomach, your heart quickens, and your brain glows warmly because you know your timing was right. It is a mixture of self-affirmation and dead fear that something was set incorrectly not only to cheat you out of the shot but from having seen it and experienced whatever it was before you with your own eyes.

In the olden days, you'd have to either laboriously process film and paper in a darkroom or laboriously anticipate prints from the local lab in order to see if that moment of glandular excitement was worth all the hub-bub. Now-a-days it is as easy as looking at your camera back. Reward or pain on an on-demand basis. Ah the joys of the digital age!

I remember clearly snapping this shot and thinking as the shutter was firing, "oh man it would be great if this turns out!" A fraction of a second later those little bits of coconut husk and good portion of coconut water covered me and my camera. It may have cooled me down a bit but I was elated when I checked the focus on the shot and saw that everything came out as well as it did.

 

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June 4, 2005

Voltage 2005 - Model I

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensMinolta 50mm f/1.4
Shutter / Aperture1/60s / f/2.8
ISO1600

This is a continuation of my post about the Voltage Fashion 2005 at First Avenue from yesterday. It is very encouraging to see that indeed Minneapolis can and does have a fashion scene.

Many of the other models and most of the fashion that night was similarly striking. It was very difficult contending with the other photographers for good shots. It was very discouraging to finally get a good angle and then have the focus be off or to have your subject move.

I shot without a flash because, well, frankly the on-camera flash just is not suited well to shooting upwards at models on a runway and my old 5400HS is completely incompatible with this camera. On of these days I'm going to have to replace it. You really feel crippled in a shooting situation like this one without having at least a good cord mounted flash and a box to bounce the light.

 

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Voltage 2005 - Joe Berns of Melodious Owl

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Enter Joe Berns of Melodious Owl. At the tender age of 16, Joe along with his band mates Jon Kuder & Wes Statler are tearing up the music scene in Minneapolis playing some of our fair city's choicest musical venues.

I became acquainted with the band through my brother Evan who attended the Perpich Center for Arts Education with them. Evan and I showed up in support of the band at the très hip Voltage '05 Fashion Amplified show at First Avenue.

Voltage 2005 Runway

I promised the guys from the band that I would do my best to take some pictures for them sometime. The stars aligned and I was able to arrange for tickets through a friend of mine. Evan and I got their early, and we were able to weasel our way into the press section. Who needs a press pass when you look like a photographer? Owing a DSLR and having a, "hey, I belong here asshole!" attitude certainly can have its advantages!

CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensMinolta 50mm f/1.4
Shutter / Aperture1/60s / f/2.8
ISO3200

The band looked fabulous that night. Unfortunately, I cannot remember who designed their outfits; but I would love to offer major kudos to them. They began their performance looking like little, thin Elton Johns in 18th century glam rock hipsters shirts and then they stripped mid-set and revealed these shear, modern looking black tops glowing with el-wire and blinking white, green and blue LED colars. I was highly impressed.

I took about 100 pictures of the band that night. Unfortunately for me the stage was quite dark to dually allow for their outfits to glow and to provide the fashion models walking the runway in front of them the spotlight. I ended up keeping maybe 5 or 6 shots. This was one of them I liked best.

I also took about 100 shots of the models that night. Tomorrow I will post of the shots that I like best. If there are any requests, I'll share more.

For the curious, below are some more links about Voltage Fashion Amplified. If you are able to go next year, do so! It's a good time!

 

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June 2, 2005

Karnataka Cane Fields IV

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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensMinolta 50mm f/1.4
Shutter / Aperture1/300s / f/2.2
ISO100

This is my travel companion and colleague Jim tasting the freshly cut and peeled cane given to him by the fieldworker from yesterday.

Although it was Jim's idea to get out and get involved in the field, he had expressed a lot of concern beforehand about having to actually try any of the crop on account of politeness. Jim was extremely afraid of catching ill from any of the many water-bourn bugs that surely run rampant in these South Indian fields that our soft American immune -systems are unaccustomed to handling. Sure enough, after we had been down there snapping pictures and interacting with everyone we both felt obliged.

A piece of cane was cut from the field, peeled and rinsed from the nearest water source available: the field's irrigation canal. I caught Jim in the only moment he actually had this piece of cane in his mouth. After which, he smiled and said, "thank you," and he took the cane with him, "for later." I think it got tossed out the window of our truck not far up the road.

He was extremely worried he was going to get el gripe or something even more horrible. He luckily got away with only a bad case of the worries.

I on the other hand foolishly devoured all of my cane. It was that good. I, too, escaped the encounter unscathed. I do consider myself lucky.

The man standing behind Jim is the field owner who asked us if we would politely send him his picture. I hope Jim made good on that. I'll have to ask him.

Overall I am pleased with the outcome of this picture for being just a quick snap. It pays to leave your camera settings in a mode that is ready for anything!

 

Posted by jordanh at 8:54 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack |

Main > Photoblog

June 1, 2005

Karnataka Cane Fields III

00042.jpg
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CameraKonica Minolta 7d
LensMinolta 50mm f/1.4
Shutter / Aperture1/250s / f/2.2
ISO100

There are some people you come across in this world that you take an instant liking too despite difficulties of culture or language. This guy was one such individual. Perhaps it was his smile or his friendly eyes. I cannot say for sure.

He was more than willing to share some of the day's crop with us. The cane he skillfully cut and peeled was so juicy and delicious. It was almost as though I was experiencing it for the first time.

It was significantly less bright at this end of the field as opposed to the direct sun falling on women in the images from yesterday and the day before. Rather stupidly I cranked the aperture dial instead of the shutter adjustment dial in order to compensate for the lack of light and ended up missing the focus on this shot. I added some extra sharpening in post-processing to compensate. Let me know if you can tell where and if it looks shabby!

I have another shot of this guy taken perhaps half a second after this one where the focus is a bit sharper but he was looking at the camera and carries just a hint of self-consciousness that I didn't like as well as the natural expression in this shot. It is amazing the subtlety of emotion that can be captured on film, even when it isn't desired.

 

Posted by jordanh at 10:47 PM | Comments (3) | TrackBack |